See How Steve Jobs Goes Gangster Against Iphone Rivals

Steve Jobs To IPhone Rivals: Say ‘ello To My Little Friend

Rumor: Apple Thinking About Buying ARM. iPhone Rivals To Sleep With The Fishes?

The following is very much a rumor, but if true, it would be absolutely huge. A UK publication is reporting that Apple is considering buying ARM Holdings — aka, the company behind most of the world’s mobile phone processors. If Apple were to buy them, it would likely reshape the mobile landscape completely.

To be clear, London’s Evening Standard is only citing “gossips” within the city’s financial district. But those gossips aren’t the only ones convinced there is something to this talk: ARM’s shares went up 8.1 points today, with more than 5 million shares changing hands by midday, the paper reports. The deal, would apparently see Apple buying ARM for something in the neighborhood of 5.2 billion British pounds, or roughly $8 billion in U.S. dollars.

Yesterday, during its earnings call, Apple revealed that it had $41.7 billion in cash in the bank — so this deal is certainly doable.

And if they did this, it would mean that almost all of Apple’s main competitors would likely have to find new chips to power their devices. While ARM doesn’t make the chips itself, it licenses out its technology to others who make the chips that go into Nokia, Sony, Samsung, HTC, and many, many other phones. This includes the iPhone and even the iPad, whose custom A4 chip is still based on ARM architecture. This also, obviously, includes phones that run Google’s Android software.

ARM architecture also is used in systems such as the Nintendo DS and the Sony PSP, which are also iPhone rivals of a different fashion: in gaming. Basically, if Apple did this, and cut off the ARM (funny, no?) supply, it would be a Michael Corleone-type maneuver to take out its rivals.

Apple bought chipmaker PA Semi back in 2008. That acquisition led to the development of the A4 chip. But that acquisition also led to the departure of key team members from the PA Semi team, who left to form a new company, Agnilux, which Google just purchased. Yeah, this continues to get more and more interesting.

Update: As Gary notes in the comments, according to the Wikipedia page, “The company [ARM] was founded as a joint venture between Acorn Computers, Apple Computer and VLSI Technology (as Advanced RISC Machines).

[via MacRumors]

Information provided by CrunchBase

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Steve Jobs to Iphone Rivals: Say ‘ello To My Little Friend

Rumor: Apple Thinking About Buying ARM. iPhone Rivals To Sleep With The Fishes?: “

The following is very much a rumor, but if true, it would be absolutely huge. A UK publication is reporting that Apple is considering buying ARM Holdings — aka, the company behind most of the world’s mobile phone processors. If Apple were to buy them, it would likely reshape the mobile landscape completely.

To be clear, London’s Evening Standard is only citing “gossips” within the city’s financial district. But those gossips aren’t the only ones convinced there is something to this talk: ARM’s shares went up 8.1 points today, with more than 5 million shares changing hands by midday, the paper reports. The deal, would apparently see Apple buying ARM for something in the neighborhood of 5.2 billion British pounds, or roughly $8 billion in U.S. dollars.

Yesterday, during its earnings call, Apple revealed that it had $41.7 billion in cash in the bank — so this deal is certainly doable.

And if they did this, it would mean that almost all of Apple’s main competitors would likely have to find new chips to power their devices. While ARM doesn’t make the chips itself, it licenses out its technology to others who make the chips that go into Nokia, Sony, Samsung, HTC, and many, many other phones. This includes the iPhone and even the iPad, whose custom A4 chip is still based on ARM architecture. This also, obviously, includes phones that run Google’s Android software.

ARM architecture also is used in systems such as the Nintendo DS and the Sony PSP, which are also iPhone rivals of a different fashion: in gaming. Basically, if Apple did this, and cut off the ARM (funny, no?) supply, it would be a Michael Corleone-type maneuver to take out its rivals.

Apple bought chipmaker PA Semi back in 2008. That acquisition led to the development of the A4 chip. But that acquisition also led to the departure of key team members from the PA Semi team, who left to form a new company, Agnilux, which Google just purchased. Yeah, this continues to get more and more interesting.

Update: As Gary notes in the comments, according to the Wikipedia page, “The company [ARM] was founded as a joint venture between Acorn Computers, Apple Computer and VLSI Technology (as Advanced RISC Machines).

[via MacRumors]

Information provided by CrunchBase


Apple Apps For Everything

Apps For Everything: Apple Continues To Try To Improve App Discovery: “

Screen shot 2009-09-29 at 2.10.23 PM

Apple today has rolled out a new series of pages on the iPhone section of its website called “Apps For Everything.” The idea here is to create an easy way for consumers to find apps based around certain categories that they may be interested in.

The categories are:

As you can see, all of these seem geared towards your average consumer across varying demographics. That’s hardly surprising seeing as with 2 billion app downloads (and counting) now, Apple clearly has a very wide reach.

But app discovery has been a problem for Apple in the past. It’s a good problem to have — it exists because there are so many apps (85,000) — but Apple is clearly realizing it needs to do something about it. The App Genius feature was one step, this hand-picked curation is clearly another.

I’ve asked Apple how it picked the topics for these apps, as well as the apps themselves, and will update if I hear back. But I suspect that just like the other areas where Apple highlights certain apps (such as in the App Store itself), it is doing so based on (what it deems to be) merit and the ability to show off some cool functionality of the iPhone and iPod touch.

As Jonathan points out in the comments below, this is also a great way for Apple to expose apps to the broader web, for users who don’t have or don’t want to load up iTunes to learn about some apps.

Much of the apps featured seem to be ones that Apple has featured in the past in the App Store or even in its commercials. It should be no surprise that developers who have been a part of this attention in the past say that the spotlight has helped drive sales through the roof.

Screen shot 2009-09-29 at 2.10.14 PM

Screen shot 2009-09-29 at 2.19.41 PM

Crunch Network: CrunchGear drool over the sexiest new gadgets and hardware.

TechCrunch50 Conference 2009: September 14-15, 2009, San Francisco




Wow, Microsoft Looks Desperate Stealing Apple Employees

RETAIL WAR: Microsoft Cherry Picking Apple Store Employees: “

apple storeMicrosoft retail stores are coming this fall, and the company has publicly stated that they’re going to build their stores right next to the competition — Apple stores. It makes perfect sense then that Microsoft would also go after Apple store staffers. And according to The Loop, that’s exactly what’s happening.

The blog is reporting that anonymous sources have confirmed that Microsoft is reaching out to Apple retail store managers and offering them “significant raises,” and sometimes even moving expenses.

But it doesn’t stop there. According to the sources, the cherry-picked Apple employees, once hired, are “then contacting some of the top sales people in the Apple retail organization offering them positions at Microsoft retail.”

If rumors are to be believed, now everything from the store design to the Guru Bars, and the actual staffers is being plucked by Microsoft in an effort to compete in the retail space. The question remains if these aggressive tactics will pay off. We tend think that consumers will buy the better products, and so far, Apple’s unique approach to retail has been successful. Can Microsoft follow suit?

Tags: Apple Store, microsoft